Google hires South Bay students for yearlong IT apprenticeships

Elva Mankin

Google launched an apprenticeship program in August for San Jose City College students who are pursuing careers in information technology.

Google, one of the South Bay’s biggest employers, chose SJCC as its first partner college for the program in California, which began mid-August and will last a full year. Eight SJCC students were chosen for the apprenticeship, during which they will become certified through Google and work as IT specialists at the company’s Sunnyvale campus. Apprentices will be paid for their hours of on-the-job training and will also receive certain benefits.

In addition to the eight apprentices, Google is covering the tuition of 12 more SJCC students, whom the school will place in apprenticeships with other large companies. Lena Tran, the college’s vice president of strategic partnerships and workforce innovation, said she’s glad community colleges are being recognized as effective training grounds for jobs in the tech sector.

“Community colleges

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Back-to-School Help for Students Without Internet

Elva Mankin

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

For Marcy Gage, getting decent broadband service for her home has been a 15-year battle. Because of her location in rural Maine, she’s had to rely on expensive-yet-spotty satellite internet because the local cable company stopped laying lines about 2,000 feet from her house.

According to Charter/Spectrum, the cost to run that extra length was $60,000, well above what Gage can afford to pay. And the special “pandemic” rate she’s now getting from her satellite company concludes in September. Instead of $26 a month, she’ll have to pay $75 for the same below-par service, or $200 a month to get rid of the data cap.

In the interim, she is working from home, sharing an internet connection that regularly tops out at 5 to 7 Mbps with her middle-school-age son, who’s about to start remote classes. “We can’t both

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COVID-19 will hit colleges when students arrive for fall semester. So why open at all? Money is a factor.

Elva Mankin

Colleges that are reopening campuses this fall know they’re bringing a higher risk of coronavirus to their community.

The questions aren’t really about if or when, but about how bad outbreaks could be — and whether having an in-person experience for students is worth the cost. With so much at stake, some students, parents and faculty are asking: Why take the risk at all? 

In many cases, it comes back to money. 

For months, colleges and experts have warned another semester of remote courses could have disastrous effects on student enrollment and college budgets.

Colleges already lost billions of dollars when they pivoted to digital instruction in the spring, in the form of refunded room-and-board payments and expensive technology for online courses. Another semester — or year — of online courses could be even worse, especially for universities without large endowments. 

For any institution, online instruction also means no money

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Remote learning during the pandemic has hit vulnerable students the hardest

Elva Mankin

In the 15 years he’s been teaching, high school literature teacher Jude Mirambeau has never faced a school year like the past one. In March, as the COVID-19 pandemic spread, his state of Florida, which is home to some of the largest school districts in the nation, shuttered its schools in an attempt to slow infections.

Teachers shifted to “distance learning.” Mirambeau’s district, the Broward County school district, which has about 270,000 students, loaned out tens of thousands of computers to help get students access.

He moved his lessons online, using educational software to assign his students work about Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” and did his best to stay in contact and field questions—but it was hard.

“I can’t see the student in front of me. I can’t provide accommodations for those who are disabled. I can’t help those who are English-language learners,” said Mirambeau, who teaches 11th-graders at McArthur

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Kenneth Cole Enlists Students for ‘Make the Statement’ Voter Initiative

Elva Mankin

As the 2020 election approaches, Kenneth Cole has engaged students for an initiative titled, “Make the Statement,” to help increase voter turnout. The goal is to empower students to create a piece of artwork that sends a powerful message.

Cole approached design students, recent graduates and alumni asking them to use their typographical design prowess to create a piece of artwork that would stop online scrollers in their tracks. The company provided students with a choice of three election season messages: “If You Don’t Vote, We Don’t Exist,” “You Vote, We Exist,” and “Vote to Exist.” The students took these messages and used them to create things from simple illustrations to a graphic design to animation.

“I have always believed that for our democracy to work, we all need to ‘Stand up and show up, or shut up.’ I also believe that voting is not just a privilege; it’s a

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Should students get a discount if they won’t be on campus because of COVID-19?

Elva Mankin

<span class="caption">COVID-19 has caused colleges to spend more to cope with the pandemic. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/beautiful-young-woman-working-at-home-with-dog-royalty-free-image/1215354586?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:elenaleonova/GettyImages">elenaleonova/GettyImages</a></span>
COVID-19 has caused colleges to spend more to cope with the pandemic. elenaleonova/GettyImages

Not long after the COVID-19 pandemic caused colleges to start teaching remotely, students balked at the idea of paying full tuition for online learning. It’s not hard to understand why. After all, they were not getting the football and basketball games, student clubs, access to labs and the library and the out-of-class conversations that are all part of the typical campus experience.

Although students who study online will not pay the room, board and activities fees that typically cover nonacademic costs, concern about paying full tuition continues this fall, as many universities opt to continue online instruction in the interest of keeping students, faculty and staff safe from the pandemic.

Is it right to expect to pay less tuition for online learning? Or are colleges justified in charging the full tuition price when classes – at least

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Students among first to return offer lessons for reopening schools

Elva Mankin

NASHVILLE – Abigail Alexander shuffled through a stack of papers, trying to find instructions for logging in to her school-issued laptop. 

The 10-year-old chatted with her best friend, a fellow fifth grader, about who is in their classes this year at Head Middle Magnet Prep and what period they have a specific teacher.

Their conversation Tuesday sounded like a typical one between excited, anxious students on the first day at a new school – except this year is like no other.

Abigail was seated in the dining room of her North Nashville home while her two younger foster siblings played around the table. Her friend was on FaceTime, the phone propped up against the side of Abigail’s laptop.

The girls are among more than 86,000 Nashville students who started the school year virtually while their schools remained closed during the the coronavirus outbreak.

Two states away in Indiana, where school

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New foreign students can’t enter US if courses online

Elva Mankin

A week after revoking sweeping new restrictions on international students, federal immigration officials on Friday announced that new foreign students will be barred from entering the United States if they plan to take their classes entirely online this fall.

In a memo to college officials, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said new students who were not already enrolled as of March 9 will “likely not be able to obtain” visas if they intend to take courses entirely online. The announcement primarily affects new students hoping to enroll at universities that will provide classes entirely online as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

International students who are already in the U.S. or are returning from abroad and already have visas will still be allowed to take classes entirely online, according to the update, even if they begin instruction in-person but their schools move online in the face of a worsening outbreak.

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Watsonville Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

Elva Mankin

WATSONVILLE, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Pajaro Valley Unified School District Superintendent Michelle Rodriguez and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days, school officials said.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it

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Rohnert Park-Cotati Students May Have To Go Back To School Online

Elva Mankin

ROHNERT PARK-COTATI, CA — If Sonoma County is still on the state of California’s COVID-19 coronavirus watchlist when the fall semester begins, students of the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District and all other school districts and charter schools in the county, will have to start the school year with online classes, according to back-to-school guidelines spelled out Friday by California Gov. Gavin Newsom.

Counties where schools are not able to start the 2020-2021 school year in physical classrooms must be taken off the watchlist and remain off the list for at least two weeks before students can return to on-campus learning, Newsom said.

In response to Newsom’s orders for California schools in the age of coronavirus, Sonoma County Superintendent of Schools Steve Herrington released a statement, and said he would meet with Sonoma County’s 38 superintendents, as well as charter school and private school leaders, early next week to discuss

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