Rapper surprises 2 teachers after viral music video about the online school year

Elva Mankin

teachers from Georgia “tapped in” to welcome students back to the new normal of online learning amid the ongoing pandemic with a rap video that has quickly captured everyone’s attention on the internet.” data-reactid=”12″Two teachers from Georgia “tapped in” to welcome students back to the new normal of online learning amid the ongoing pandemic with a rap video that has quickly captured everyone’s attention on the internet.

Audrianna Williams and Callie Evans showed off their impressive rapping and dance skills with original lyrics set to the tune of Jack Harlow’s “What’s Poppin'” to get students excited about the start of this unique school year.

The music video of the two Monroe Comprehensive High School teachers from Albany, Georgia, which was shot and edited by Jamel Overstreet, has garnered nearly 300,000 views on Instagram and captured the attention of the artist who rapped the original verse.

PHOTO: Jack Harlow surprised

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Like spring, Broward’s first day of school held online marred by some technical glitches

Elva Mankin

The virtual school door had problems opening Wednesday morning in Broward County.

Students were met with log-in errors, slow connectivity and crashing dashboards during the first day of the new school year, held virtually at public schools across Broward County.

The issues frustrated parents who were hoping their children would have a smoother experience than the abrupt online transition in the spring at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

At a press conference at the school district’s Fort Lauderdale headquarters, Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie said an estimated 197,000 students attended online school Wednesday out of the 261,000 students enrolled in the district. There were 212,000 people on the online system simultaneously, including teachers and administrators.

He called reports of glitches on Canvas, the district’s online learning platform, “exaggerated.” He said the district does not expect the same issues to happen Thursday.

“There was a period between 8:35 and 8:50,

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Teachers drop viral music video set to trendy TikTok song ahead of online school year

Elva Mankin

teachers from Georgia “tapped in” to welcome students back to the new normal of online learning amid the ongoing pandemic with a rap video that has quickly captured everyone’s attention on the internet.” data-reactid=”12″Two teachers from Georgia “tapped in” to welcome students back to the new normal of online learning amid the ongoing pandemic with a rap video that has quickly captured everyone’s attention on the internet.

Audrianna Williams and Callie Evans showed off their impressive rapping and dance skills with original lyrics set to the tune of Jack Harlow’s “What’s Poppin'” to get students excited about the start of this unique school year.

The two Monroe Comprehensive High School teachers in Albany, Georgia, enlisted the professional help of Jamel Overstreet to shoot, produce and edit the music video that has garnered over 13,000 views on Instagram in just two days.

“It was very fun, they are both so

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‘Are we ready?’ LAUSD’s first day back to school, online and on Zoom, is anything but normal

Elva Mankin

Xavier Reyes, cofounder of Alta Public Schools, shows what a classroom would look like at Academia Moderna, a charter school, when the Huntington Park campus is allowed to reopen. <span class=(Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/WAXbhzIEm6xUXIu7eoZQQw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/Sz8LdC2W1c6LuvQzbJ3NgA–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/99594ae15b9f32c46a698c216d779f26″ data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/WAXbhzIEm6xUXIu7eoZQQw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ3MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/Sz8LdC2W1c6LuvQzbJ3NgA–~B/aD01NjA7dz04NDA7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/99594ae15b9f32c46a698c216d779f26″/
Xavier Reyes, cofounder of Alta Public Schools, shows what a classroom would look like at Academia Moderna, a charter school, when the Huntington Park campus is allowed to reopen. (Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)

New back-to-school shoes, but no recess to run around. Decorative Zoom backgrounds instead of artwork newly stapled on bulletin boards. Freshly waxed floors with no students to scuff them up.

A new school year like no other begins Tuesday in Los Angeles when some 500,000 students are expected to sign on and show up at a distance — and for many, at a disadvantage — devoid of the traditional in-person joy of seeing friends and teachers.

Campuses are deserted except for a skeleton staff, but some 30,000 teachers from 1,400 schools will fire up their computers from home, virtually beckoning children to participate in

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Is this new online-only private school the future of education?

Elva Mankin

boy studies on laptop
boy studies on laptop

As a parent of a teen facing her final year of GCSE study after months out of school – often with patchy teaching – I’m feeling decidedly nervous. Although the Government has promised to open schools in September, a new study says a lack of an effective track and trace system means this might not be safe. Adding to the chaos, a dreaded ‘second wave’ of COVID-19 may also lead to unpredictable local or national lockdowns. It’s not just parents like me who are concerned. As Scottish children mourn their disappointing GCSE grades, a new study, Life After Lockdown, from the nation’s leading youth programme NCS (National Citizen Service) has found that 67 per cent of teens aged 16-17 are worried about their education.  

The result? More and more parents are looking for alternatives to traditional schools. 

Across the UK, Google searches for the term’ online

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These online learning tips will help parents prepare for a successful school year, even if it is virtual.

Elva Mankin

Many of the nation’s largest school districts plan to begin the fall semester online-only. As schools consider reopening, children face a future in which online courses will probably be part of the curriculum. To make the best of this situation, here are some tips to help your child adapt to learning from home.

Studies show that in online learning, parents often take on the role of a teacher. Making school a priority will help keep kids from treating online learning as a vacation. 

Research suggests that some types of parental participation have a greater impact on children’s academic achievement than others. One analysis showed that schoolchildren benefit from discussions about learning and school-related issues with their parents and from joint readings. 

Reduce distractions

A report in 2016 found that students spent about one-fifth of class time on laptops, smartphones and tablets, knowing that doing so could harm their grades. They

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Homeschool pods are gaining traction amid worries about school reopening; here’s how parents are getting the finances to work

Elva Mankin

Katrina Mulligan says her decision to organize a homeschooling “pod” – a modern version of a one-room schoolhouse, with a small group of parents splitting the cost of hiring teachers – wasn’t done lightly.

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the nation, she’s grown increasingly wary about her public school’s plan for getting kids back in the building.

“I don’t think it’s a great idea to send your kids to school in the middle of the pandemic,” says Mulligan, 40. “A lot of us started freaking out.”

At the same time, she adds, she and her husband found it difficult this spring to juggle working from home while managing their 6-year-old daughter’s virtual schooling. That experience, plus concerns about school safety, prompted her family to connect with four other families in their hometown of Alexandria, Virginia, to create a homeschooling “pod.” Mulligan plans on hiring a teacher to

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Tri-Valley School Donations May Be Curtailed By Coronavirus

Elva Mankin

TRI-VALLEY, CA — Only one thing is certain about the Tri-Valley’s upcoming school year, and that’s uncertainty.

With the coronavirus being far from under control, school officials have been debating when, or if, classrooms will reopen in the fall and, more importantly, how California’s economic crisis will ultimately impact the bottom line on budgets already stretched to the limit and largely dependent on revenue from the state.

Also impacted will be the flow of what has been millions of dollars donated by an extensive network of Tri-Valley nonprofit organizations, money used to supplement the increasing costs of educational activities.

During the 2016, 2017 and 2018 school years alone, nearly 80 individual tax-exempt nonprofit organizations provided some $40 million to the region’s four school districts — San Ramon Valley Unified, Dublin Unified, Pleasanton Unified and Livermore Valley Unified.

Chief among these benefactors is the San Ramon Valley Education Fund (SRVEF) based

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Baltimore teacher delivers for her school families

Elva Mankin

Sarita Sullivan quit her job in Washington, D.C., five years ago and moved to Baltimore to make a difference in the aftermath of Freddie Gray’s death.

“I felt like I needed to do something more,” she said.

She quickly fell in love with the city, living in Mount Vernon and Charles Village before moving to her current neighborhood, Midtown.

She became a teacher in the hope of making a difference in the lives of the next generation.

As a special education teacher, specializing in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten, at Belmont Elementary School in West Baltimore, Sullivan has bonded with her students and their families.

“The whole … school closure was difficult,” Sullivan said. “I didn’t get to say goodbye to my students. Because working in special ed I became close to the families. It was difficult that I couldn’t see them every day.”

She noticed that a number of her students

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Watsonville Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

Elva Mankin

WATSONVILLE, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Pajaro Valley Unified School District Superintendent Michelle Rodriguez and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days, school officials said.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it

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