How Far-Right Personalities And Conspiracy Theorists Are Cashing In On The Pandemic Online

Elva Mankin

Credit –

On the evening of Feb. 6, as U.S. news networks reported the death of a doctor in Wuhan, China, who had warned of a deadly new virus, thousands of Americans were tuning in to a different kind of show.

“The good news is I heard actually that you can’t get this if you’re white,” Nick Fuentes, a far-right political commentator, told viewers on his “America First” channel on the streaming platform DLive. “You’re only really susceptible to this virus if you’re Asian,” Fuentes continued. “I think we’ll be O.K.”

Fuentes, 22, a prolific podcaster who on his shows has compared the Holo-caust to a cookie-baking operation, argued that the segregation of Black Americans “was better for them,” and that the First Amendment was “not written for Muslims,” is doing better than O.K. during the COVID-19 pandemic. He’s part of a loose cohort of far-right provocateurs, white nationalists and

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How IoT revolutionized medical care during the pandemic

Elva Mankin

Over the last few months, the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the world into an unprecedented situation. It even gave birth to new concepts such as social-distancing and prioritized technologies like cloud, internet of things (IoT) services, and artificial intelligence. Likewise, IoT and the internet of medical things (IoMT) have witnessed a number of innovative revolutions to address the coronavirus crisis. These technologies in healthcare and retail may have a long-lasting impact in the upcoming future.

IoT has predominantly become one of the frequent expressions across the technological domain nowadays, with the potential to significantly enhance the way we interact with the contemporary world. From high-level healthcare devices to common household gadgets, IoT technology is getting more intelligent and connected to the internet, facilitating seamless communication between networks and devices.

Why medical connectivity matters?

The coronavirus outbreak has led IoT healthcare companies to promptly provide solutions for combatting the increasing

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Pandemic forces Malaysian palm industry to rethink reliance on foreign labour

Elva Mankin

By Mei Mei Chu

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) – Malaysia’s palm oil producers are embarking on a rare recruitment drive to hire locals and accelerating industry mechanisation as they grapple with a severe shortage of foreign labour due to the coronavirus pandemic.

As the September-November peak production season approaches, companies are erecting banners near plantations and posting online job advertisements boasting free housing, free water and other perks of estate life in a bid to lure workers to do everything from driving tractors to harvesting.

Already, travel and movement restrictions have left the world’s second-largest palm oil producer grappling with a shortage of 37,000 workers, nearly 10% of the total workforce. The Malaysian Palm Oil Association (MPOA) believes this could blow out to 70,000 workers once borders reopen.

“This is the first time we are making such a big effort to hire Malaysians, but it is also the first time we

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Christian leaders debate how to do church amid pandemic

Elva Mankin

On a recent Sunday, Rod Loy, senior pastor at the First Assembly of God in North Little Rock, Arkansas, delivered the message of the Gospel through his computer screen.

“It’s easy to live out your faith when everything is going good,” he preached to his congregation. “But the real test is difficult. How does your faith hold up when the doctor gives you a bad report, the kids get bad grades and you can’t pay your bills? How does your faith hold up when you lose your job in the middle of a pandemic? The true test of faith is a difficulty, hardship and persecution.” 

As he spoke, members of the church typed “amen” in the comment section. The church has used Facebook to livestream its services for the past couple of months.  

Across the USA, faith leaders debate how they can continue to pray in fellowship with others while

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5 lasting changes from the COVID-19 pandemic

Elva Mankin

COVID-19 has completely changed life, and while many hope those changes are temporary, the pandemic has unearthed weaknesses in the status quo. After every major crisis, humanity is forced to identify those weaknesses and evolve accordingly. The 2020 pandemic, in its aftermath, is set to change life for a very long time. Here are five fundamental ways.

1. Employment: More automation

The pandemic has helped identify work roles that can be downsized or replaced with technology as a technique to mitigate infection risk while retaining productivity.

“Online [ordering] has become the lifeline both for consumers looking for products [and] also for retailers looking for cash,” says Marc-André Kamel, who leads Bain’s Global Retail practice. A survey by McKinsey & Company showed that more Americans expect to make their purchases online post-COVID-19 compared to pre-pandemic, with 30-49% of people expecting to increase their online grocery shopping. Naturally, this will result in

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Remote learning during the pandemic has hit vulnerable students the hardest

Elva Mankin

In the 15 years he’s been teaching, high school literature teacher Jude Mirambeau has never faced a school year like the past one. In March, as the COVID-19 pandemic spread, his state of Florida, which is home to some of the largest school districts in the nation, shuttered its schools in an attempt to slow infections.

Teachers shifted to “distance learning.” Mirambeau’s district, the Broward County school district, which has about 270,000 students, loaned out tens of thousands of computers to help get students access.

He moved his lessons online, using educational software to assign his students work about Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” and did his best to stay in contact and field questions—but it was hard.

“I can’t see the student in front of me. I can’t provide accommodations for those who are disabled. I can’t help those who are English-language learners,” said Mirambeau, who teaches 11th-graders at McArthur

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Privileged parents form COVID pandemic pods that widen education gaps. We can do better.

Elva Mankin

I saw a Tesla with #BlackLivesMatter written on the rear windshield the other day. It appeared to be a parent picking up their kid from a “pandemic pod,” which, if you’re not familiar, is a small cluster of families who pool resources to hire a private tutor, who may be a parent. These pods are very popular among my neighbors in the Bay Area of California. Nearby I could see a YMCA, which provides child care and after-school programming. It shut down due to COVID-19.

I’m not the first to point out that pods are emblematic of educational inequity in the United States. It’s a winner-take-all approach, with privileged, often mostly white students hoarding academic and social gains and further segregating our K-12 systems. This hypocrisy is why pod parents make me so angry. If Black lives matter, doesn’t that include Black children? What about Black futures?

Pods don’t just

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Online prayers. Social distancing in the pews. Christian leaders debate how to do church amid pandemic.

Elva Mankin

On a recent Sunday, Rod Loy, senior pastor at the First Assembly of God in North Little Rock, Arkansas, delivered the message of the Gospel through his computer screen.

“It’s easy to live out your faith when everything is going good,” he preached to his congregation. “But the real test is difficult. How does your faith hold up when the doctor gives you a bad report, the kids get bad grades, and you can’t pay your bills? How does your faith hold up when you lose your job in the middle of a pandemic? The true test of faith is a difficulty, hardship and persecution.” 

As he spoke, members of the church typed “amen” in the comment section. The church has been using Facebook to livestream its services for the past couple of months.  

Across the U.S., faith leaders are debating how they can continue to pray in fellowship with

Read More

Parents form pandemic pods to educate kids. Let’s build a better alternative.

Elva Mankin

I saw a Tesla with #BlackLivesMatter written on the rear windshield the other day. It appeared to be a parent picking up their kid from a “pandemic pod,” which, if you’re not familiar, is a small cluster of families who pool resources to hire a private tutor, who may be a parent. These pods are very popular among my neighbors in the Bay Area of California. Nearby I could see a YMCA, which provides child care and after-school programming. It shut down due to COVID-19.

I’m not the first to point out that pods are emblematic of educational inequity in the United States. It’s a winner-take-all approach, with privileged, often mostly white students hoarding academic and social gains and further segregating our K-12 systems. This hypocrisy is why pod parents make me so angry. If Black lives matter, doesn’t that include Black children? What about Black futures?

Pods don’t just

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What will going to university be like during a pandemic?

Elva Mankin

PA
PA

With results for A-level students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland published today, thousands of teenagers will find out if they’ve received a spot at a university.

But with the continuing coronavirus pandemic, university is likely to be a bit different this year.

There are many challenges facing UK universities – student and staff health and welfare, living arrangements, and how to do a socially distanced Freshers week.

Here are just some of the ways university might change:

‘Blended’ learning

Most universities will take a “blended approach” to teaching and learning, with many universities announcing that lectures involving whole year groups will be given online.

In addition, some in-person teaching will be provided, such as tutorials, but they will take place in bigger rooms in a socially distanced way.

Doug Clow, an online learning consultant who has spent 20 years at the Open University and is now advising universities

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