Parents go into debt to pay for kids’ breakfasts, lunches

Elva Mankin

Switching from in-person to online schooling has been hard on many families – and on their budgets.

About one-quarter of parents say they’ve gone into debt to pay for their kids’ at-home school expenses, and many blame the cost of their kids’ breakfasts and lunches when they switched to learning remotely from home.

A survey from Credit Karma  examines how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies, the survey of more than 1,000 parents found.

The reasons for the debt are higher grocery prices and the sudden switch to at-home schooling in March.

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Delaying college has a price: Study says students could lose $90K over their lifetime

Before the pandemic, about 30 million children were fed daily by their

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Parents are going into debt to pay for kids’ breakfasts, lunches

Elva Mankin

Switching from in-person to online schooling has been hard on many families – and on their budgets.

About one-quarter of parents say they’ve gone into debt to pay for their kids’ at-home school expenses, with a large share blaming the cost of paying for their kids’ breakfasts and lunches when they switched to learning remotely from home.

new survey from Credit Karma, which wanted to examine how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies this year, the survey of more than 1,000 parents found.” data-reactid=”13″That’s according to a new survey from Credit Karma, which wanted to examine how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies this year, the survey of more than 1,000 parents

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14 things you (or your kids) need for distance learning this year

Elva Mankin

14 things you (or your kids) need for distance learning this year
14 things you (or your kids) need for distance learning this year

With many schools across the country either closed or operating under a hybrid model to prevent the spread of COVID-19, students and their guardians alike are bracing themselves for a fall semester of distance learning — and consequently, a back-to-school shopping shakeup.

In addition to setting up a study station and stocking up on traditional school supplies (like your No. 2 pencils and your spiral notebooks), the move to virtual classrooms means investing in a laptop, wireless headphones, computer accessories, and other gadgets that make it possible to participate in full-time online learning. (Unsurprisingly, the National Retail Foundation expects school supply spending to reach a record-high $33.99 billion this year, up from $26.2 billion in 2019.)

If you need help navigating this unfamiliar territory without breaking the bank, don’t fret: Below, we’ve compiled a definitive (and affordable) list

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Parents form pandemic pods to educate kids. Let’s build a better alternative.

Elva Mankin

I saw a Tesla with #BlackLivesMatter written on the rear windshield the other day. It appeared to be a parent picking up their kid from a “pandemic pod,” which, if you’re not familiar, is a small cluster of families who pool resources to hire a private tutor, who may be a parent. These pods are very popular among my neighbors in the Bay Area of California. Nearby I could see a YMCA, which provides child care and after-school programming. It shut down due to COVID-19.

I’m not the first to point out that pods are emblematic of educational inequity in the United States. It’s a winner-take-all approach, with privileged, often mostly white students hoarding academic and social gains and further segregating our K-12 systems. This hypocrisy is why pod parents make me so angry. If Black lives matter, doesn’t that include Black children? What about Black futures?

Pods don’t just

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The Best Back-to-School Tech Your Kids Need This Semester

Elva Mankin

Photo credit: Staff
Photo credit: Staff

From Popular Mechanics

For many families, the prospect of going back to school is still up in the air. Even if schools do open up again, some of us are still opting to keep our kids at home. But just because it may be the safest option does not mean that it is the easiest. Whether your school district is going back in-person, virtually, or a combination of the two, your kid or teenager could probably use their own new tech, like a laptop or tablet, headphones, and more—not only to set them up for success, but also to make life a little easier on all the parents out there.

Check out the quick reviews below of the best tech for kids, or scroll deeper for full reviews of those models plus other high-ranking options.

How We Selected This Tech

We researched 10 expert sources, such as

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I’m a Teacher, and I Truly Believe You Should Keep Your Kids Home This Fall

Elva Mankin

Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States

I’ve been an educator for 14 years, and in my time in the classroom, I have faced some incredible obstacles and challenges. The end of the last school year, with the COVID-19 pandemic, is one of the hardest and strangest things I’ve experienced in my time as an educator. It felt surreal to have no time to say goodbye to my eighth grade students and to go home on a Friday, expecting first to return in two weeks, then a month, and then not at all for the rest of the school year. Like most educators I know, I figured that we would be open by fall. My school district has chosen to start the year with distance learning, but from what I’ve heard from friends, family, and other educators, many school districts are giving families a choice. Even if you have the option to

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I’m a Teacher and I Truly Believe You Should Keep Your Kids Home This Fall

Elva Mankin

I’ve been an educator for 14 years, and in my time in the classroom, I have faced some incredible obstacles and challenges. The end of the last school year, with the COVID-19 pandemic, is one of the hardest and strangest things I’ve experienced in my time as an educator. It felt surreal to have no time to say goodbye to my 8th grade students and to go home on a Friday, expecting first to return in two weeks, then a month, and then not at all for the rest of the school year. Like most educators I know, I figured that we would be open by fall. My school district has chosen to start the year with distance learning, but from what I’ve heard from friends, family, and other educators, many school districts are giving families a choice. Even if you have the option to send your child back to

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How the Pandemic Is Changing the Way Retailers Pick Product for Kids & the Whole Family

Elva Mankin

Heading into a spring season unlike any other, how top retailers are buying — and what they’re betting on.

Will Cooper, SVP & GMM of women’s shoes, Saks Fifth Avenue, New York

More from Footwear News

Buying Logistics: “We are currently conducting all market appointments digitally. Vendors have enhanced photography of their collections, with many adding video content to actually see the shoe on a model. We have adapted to this new way of working through leveraging technology, but anticipate returning to the showroom when it is safe to do so.”

Trend Talk: “Through the pandemic, we have seen our customers focused on casual shoes, particularly sneakers and flat sandals, and we expect this to continue into spring ’21. We are excited to see designers elevating casual shoes with embellishments to make women feel ‘dressed up’ while still wearing a casual and more comfortable look. We will continue to offer

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3 ways to promote social skills in homebound kids

Elva Mankin

<span class="caption">Too much time screen time can lead to lower self-esteem.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/teen-boy-plays-game-on-digital-tablet-at-home-royalty-free-image/1146552988" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images">SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images</a></span>
Too much time screen time can lead to lower self-esteem. SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images

With the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic getting worse in most of the country, a growing number of school districts from San Francisco to Atlanta have determined that a return to daily in-person instruction isn’t yet safe or viable. They aim to to stick with remote learning as the school year gets underway.

Based on my research about the psychological effects of digital technology, I’ve seen that when children and teens spend a great deal of time isolated at home and gazing at screens their social skills and self-esteem can suffer and they may become lonelier. Fortunately, there are ways to lower those risks while young people spend way more time than usual at home.

Teenage boy sits in chair playing a video game on a big flat screen.
Teenage boy sits in chair playing a video game on a big flat screen.

1. Practice paying attention to other

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Open schools for younger kids, top pediatrician says

Elva Mankin

WASHINGTON — Younger children pose a smaller risk of catching and transmitting the coronavirus, a top pediatrician told Congress on Thursday, providing a scientific argument for why elementary schools could potentially open in parts of the country next month.

“School systems may consider prioritizing the return of younger children and taking additional measures to ensure physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings among older children,” Dr. Sean O’Leary told the House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education on Thursday morning. 

Kindergarten teacher Holly Rupprecht carries plexiglass panels to her room at Zion Lutheran School in Bethalto, Ill., on Monday. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Kindergarten teacher Holly Rupprecht carries plexiglass panels to her room at Zion Lutheran School in Bethalto, Ill., on Monday. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

The hearing was titled “Underfunded & Unprepared,” a sign of how House Democrats, who control the chamber’s agenda, view the matter. 

O’Leary, a vice chair for infectious disease at the American Academy of Pediatrics, also cited a South Korean

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