We’ve been working from home for 5 months. Here’s what we learned.

Elva Mankin

We've been working from home for 5 months. Here's what we learned.
We’ve been working from home for 5 months. Here’s what we learned.

Like many, many others around the world, we’ve been working from home for close to six months here at Mashable due to the coronavirus pandemic. We miss our coworkers and our lunch spots, but we’ve managed to get by knowing we’re fortunate to be able to work from home at all.

Since we work on the internet, a big part of “getting by” has been learning the myriad ways tech can help and hinder us throughout the day. With that in mind, here are just a few of the basics that we and other remote workers have had to internalize and make part of our daily routines while our lives were turned upside down by the pandemic. We know you’d prefer to be back at the office or out with your friends, but take these tips to heart

Read More

Do lawmakers understand Google and Facebook enough to regulate them?

Elva Mankin

Many of us have had the feeling that technology, which continues to change at an ever-dizzying pace, may be leaving us behind. That was embodied this past week during a Congressional hearing, nominally convened to investigate antitrust concerns of four big tech titans: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

While the five-and-a-half-hour inquiry touched on a range topics from pesky spam filters and search results to how companies approached acquisitions, the House Judiciary subcommittee hearing laid one thing bare: A sizable disconnect appears to exist between the technology Americans are using and depending on in their daily lives and the knowledge base of people with the power and responsibility to decide its future and regulation.

“Consumers and investors walk away feeling like a lot of these lawmakers don’t really understand the business models to an extent that they could then navigate them and put laws in place that will dictate the

Read More

7 Penny Stocks for the Valiant Investor

Elva Mankin

Penny stocks are notoriously risky investments because they’re often speculative in nature. With that said, investors who are willing to take on a relatively high level of risk could find them to be a good way to play the current market uncertainty. With the novel coronavirus still looming and equity prices climbing ever higher, looking for penny stocks to buy could be a good way to find value.

Laura Gonzalez, Ph.D, an Associate Professor of Finance at California State University, Long Beach, said penny stocks deliver the most value when they’re more-or-less undiscovered. As trading volume increases, the wider market starts to pay attention. 

Historical data shows that penny stocks receive less attention from investors, are oftentimes undervalued and underpriced, and therefore poised to deliver superior returns. When superior returns materialize, analysts and other investors notice them, but [the] attention is not sustained for a long time.

InvestorPlace – Stock

Read More