pandemic

How the Pandemic Is Changing the Way Retailers Pick Product for Kids & the Whole Family

Heading into a spring season unlike any other, how top retailers are buying — and what they’re betting on.

Will Cooper, SVP & GMM of women’s shoes, Saks Fifth Avenue, New York

More from Footwear News

Buying Logistics: “We are currently conducting all market appointments digitally. Vendors have enhanced photography of their collections, with many adding video content to actually see the shoe on a model. We have adapted to this new way of working through leveraging technology, but anticipate returning to the showroom when it is safe to do so.”

Trend Talk: “Through the pandemic, we have seen our customers focused on casual shoes, particularly sneakers and flat sandals, and we expect this to continue into spring ’21. We are excited to see designers elevating casual shoes with embellishments to make women feel ‘dressed up’ while still wearing a casual and more comfortable look. We will continue to offer

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How pandemic pods and zutors are changing home-schooling

When the number of coronavirus cases began to rise in the San Francisco area in early July, mother of one Lian Chikako Chang started a Facebook group to support local families and teachers who were suddenly facing the prospect of schools not opening in person as planned in mid-August.

The “Pandemic Pods” group, which aims to help with childcare and schooling needs, grew to more than 30,000 members within three weeks, as areas across the US were hit by Covid-19 spikes and more schools decided to stay shut.

“Families were left scrabbling for solutions,” says Ms Chang. “Most parents have to work, and most jobs are not compatible with home-schooling”.

And it’s not just Facebook parents are turning to. Matchmaking apps and websites have sprung up offering to help parents connect with other families to form “safe” learning pods, or match them with teachers who can give online lessons, dubbed

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Virtual house hunting gets a pandemic boost

It’s Saturday evening in London, and I’m house shopping in Dublin, thanks to a virtual-reality headset.

Temporarily forgetting she is sitting beside me, I shout to my wife: “I’m in the children’s bedroom.”

We can’t go to the Republic of Ireland ourselves to do this. Travellers from Great Britain need to restrict their movements for a fortnight, so nipping over and back is off the cards.

But I can take several paces through a virtual seaside flat in Dublin’s Dún Laoghaire, while based in our south London home.

Circles appear on the floor of the Dublin flat and, using hand controls, I can glide between them and explore.

Standing in each circle, I can peer up, down, whichever way I like. It is immersive and I feel as though I’m there, even if moving about feels a bit like using Google Street View.

Welcome to house shopping in the age

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How pandemic pods and zutors are changing homeschooling

When the number of coronavirus cases began to rise in the San Francisco area in early July, mother of one Lian Chikako Chang started a Facebook group to support local families and teachers who were suddenly facing the prospect of schools not opening in person as planned in mid-August.

The “Pandemic Pods” group, which aims to help with childcare and schooling needs, grew to more than 30,000 members within three weeks, as areas across the US were hit by Covid-19 spikes and more schools decided to stay shut.

“Families were left scrabbling for solutions,” says Ms Chang. “Most parents have to work, and most jobs are not compatible with homeschooling”.

And it’s not just Facebook parents are turning to. Matchmaking apps and websites have sprung up offering to help parents connect with other families to form “safe” learning pods, or match them with teachers who can give online lessons, dubbed

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Pandemic revs up race for U.S. online car sales

By Nick Carey

DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) – After years of being part of a future that never quite arrived, the coronavirus pandemic has put U.S. online car sellers on the map.

Now comes a race to spend vast sums on digital commerce platforms specifically designed to handle auto sales. Without deep pockets, many startups and others trying to join the online game will likely be left in the dust.

“The big three (auto) e-commerce players will grow substantially, but it will be hard to be a new entrant,” said Toby Russell, joint chief executive officer of Shift, which will go public to join rival Carvana <CVNA.N> and Vroom <VRM.O> later this quarter.

“The pay to play on this thing is in the hundreds of millions and the early journey is hard, especially building out the technology,” Russell said.

Online sales still only account for around 1% of the roughly

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How scientists revived an old-school treatment for a 21st century pandemic

Dr. Arturo Casadevall, a microbiologist and physician at Johns Hopkins University, has spearheaded a nationwide initiative to test the healing powers of "convalescent plasma" from COVID-19 survivors. <span class="copyright">(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Dr. Arturo Casadevall, a microbiologist and physician at Johns Hopkins University, has spearheaded a nationwide initiative to test the healing powers of “convalescent plasma” from COVID-19 survivors. (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

A few weeks after the new coronavirus arrived on U.S. shores, Dr. Arturo Casadevall hatched a plan to beat back the outbreak with a medical advance so powerful it had earned a Nobel Prize.

In 1901.

That’s when Dr. Emil Adolf von Behring was honored for pioneering the use of so-called convalescent serum as a treatment for diphtheria. In 1892, the Prussian bacteriologist infected horses with the pathogen that causes the deadly disease. If the beasts recovered, Von Behring harvested their blood, removed its red blood cells and clotting proteins, and introduced the resulting antibody-rich fluid into the bloodstreams of human diphtheria patients.

Until a diphtheria vaccine came into broad use in the 1930s, Von Behring’s daring

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Emmy Awards ceremony to be held online due to pandemic

Los Angeles (AFP) – A day after announcing nominations for the Emmy Awards, the Television Academy on Wednesday informed top nominees that the ceremony in September will be held online because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The announcement was expected given the restrictions and lockdowns imposed since the virus outbreak which has wreaked havoc in the entertainment industry.

The Emmys — television’s equivalent of the Oscars — will take place on September 20 and will be the first major awards show in Hollywood since the coronavirus crisis began.

Late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel is set to host the festivities broadcast on ABC.

In the letter sent to select nominees and the contents of which were confirmed to AFP by an Academy spokesman, organizers said they were forced to make the tough decision to hold the ceremony online given the circumstances.

“Aside from NOT being able to come together in one

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Coronavirus pandemic gives CES 2021 an opportunity to attract an online audience

The CES show, the largest trade gathering in the United States and the premier annual meeting of the tech industry, will not be greeting the public in January, as planned, due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

Instead, the organizers say they’re going all-digital, with several days of online entertainment planned for Jan. 6-9, 2021. 

Good luck with that. 

As a longtime attendee, with more years of attendance than I care to admit, I think the odds of success here are very tough. Yes, we can devote three days of our lives to getting to Las Vegas and roaming the show floor. It’s a lot harder to do it in front of a computer for hours. 

CES always attracts huge crowds
CES always attracts huge crowds

COVID-19 VICTIM: CES 2021 cancels in-person show, moves event online

Smart speakers: Are Facebook and Alexa really listening? 6 common tech myths debunked

That said, can CES put on a great

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What To Do If The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Forcing You Into Early Retirement

Until recently, the goal of early retirement was a lofty one. But with the chaos caused by the coronavirus pandemic, some older workers are being pushed into retirement ― whether they’re ready or not ― minus the sandy beaches and financial freedom.

During past recessions, it was common for older employees to drop out of the workforce completely rather than try to compete for new jobs. But now, there’s even more pressure to abandon working life.

“Since this is a global health pandemic, it has added a layer of complexity not seen in past recessions,” said Jeffrey Lewis, a financial advisor with Savant Wealth Management. Some older workers may be less inclined to return to the office for fear of contracting the virus themselves, or bringing it home to their spouse or kids who may have an underlying health condition, Lewis said. “If employers are not able to meet

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In the pandemic, getting through the day feels like a project

How to safely move during a pandemic
How to safely move during a pandemic

Who’s ready to pack up and move in the middle of a global pandemic? Oh wait, that’s me. I apparently am. 

I wrote several weeks ago that my husband and I had made the decision to move, not just out of our apartment but to a new state, even as the COVID-19 crisis continues. It was a hard choice to make, but as the end of our lease approached, the forced separation from our families wrought by the pandemic came to mind first. With the OK of our workplaces, we decided to move to Pennsylvania to be closer to family.

Moving is a production during normal times, but a monumental task during the pandemic. But there’s a certain clarity that comes from the survival mode we’ve all been living in since this began. We know it’s the right thing to do, even

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