Many Schools Are Using a Hybrid Learning Model This Year; Here’s What Parents Should Know

Elva Mankin

Depending on what part of the US you live in, going back to school in the traditional sense may be entirely off the table. And regardless of how old your children are, navigating these uncertain times have proven to be a hellish nightmare we wish we could wake up from challenging to say the least. While some families are setting up “pandemic pods” – where a small group of students of similar ages and abilities gathers at one family’s home to learn from a teacher – others are working with their local districts using a hybrid learning model.

Naturally, getting a full understanding of various learning setups can be hard for those of us who don’t specifically have a background in education. In an effort to keep parents informed about the options their kids may have, we tapped Vanessa Vakharia, the founder and director of The Math Guru and

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Antiviral apparel? Here’s what experts say about clothing that is said to kill COVID-19

Elva Mankin

Brands are rolling out apparel made of fabrics with antiviral technology in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus. But is the clothing necessary?

In March, Swiss textile group HeiQ announced it had developed a treatment for textiles called Viroblock NPJ03 that it says is antiviral and antimicrobial.

The company said the treatment — an “invisible film” for fabrics, per Vogue — reduces 99.9% of SARS-CoV-2 after 30 minutes, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Artistic Denim Mills, a denim and garment manufacturer based in Pakistan, announced in June that it would partner with HeiQ to treat its products with Viroblock in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19.

“COVID-19 has reset the world,” Faisal Ahmed, CEO of Artistic Denim Mills, said in a news release. “This means we have to change how we live our lives. How our clothes protect us will be a key decision in what

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Cottagecore is all over the internet. Here’s where to experience it in California

Elva Mankin

 <span class="copyright">(Ross May / Los Angeles Times; Getty Images)</span>
(Ross May / Los Angeles Times; Getty Images)

A picnic lunch surrounded by rolling hills. Bouquets of wildflowers and baby barn animals. Not a laptop or cellphone in sight.

If this imagery is soothing to you, you’re not alone. Welcome to cottagecore, a sunny corner of the internet where you can immerse yourself in an idealized, rose-tinted version of country living. Think Taylor Swift posing among the brambles in her latest album art, the Weasley family’s shabby-chic home and gnome-infested garden in the “Harry Potter” series and, of course, “Little House on the Prairie” (minus the grasshopper plague that destroys Pa’s harvest).

Despite a surface-level omission of modern technology, cottagecore has proliferated on TikTok and other online platforms — and is generating headlines. Just last week, an Agence France-Presse story posited that cottagecore is “poised to overtake hygge as the biggest lifestyle trend of the post-coronavirus era.”

It’s no surprise

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Symptoms of COVID-19? Here’s what you can do right now

Elva Mankin

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Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)
Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)

Developing symptoms of COVID-19 is understandably terrifying. And, if you don’t have a primary care physician or you’re nervous to go to your doctor’s office or local hospital, it’s hard to know what to do.

That’s where telehealth comes in. Many doctor’s offices have shifted to providing healthcare through video chat or over the phone during the pandemic. For patients who don’t already have a provider, services like Amwell, one of the top telehealth platforms in the country, allow for quick and easy access to a doctor without a long wait time, and it’s relatively inexpensive for those who do

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We’ve been working from home for 5 months. Here’s what we learned.

Elva Mankin

We've been working from home for 5 months. Here's what we learned.
We’ve been working from home for 5 months. Here’s what we learned.

Like many, many others around the world, we’ve been working from home for close to six months here at Mashable due to the coronavirus pandemic. We miss our coworkers and our lunch spots, but we’ve managed to get by knowing we’re fortunate to be able to work from home at all.

Since we work on the internet, a big part of “getting by” has been learning the myriad ways tech can help and hinder us throughout the day. With that in mind, here are just a few of the basics that we and other remote workers have had to internalize and make part of our daily routines while our lives were turned upside down by the pandemic. We know you’d prefer to be back at the office or out with your friends, but take these tips to heart

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Homeschool pods are gaining traction amid worries about school reopening; here’s how parents are getting the finances to work

Elva Mankin

Katrina Mulligan says her decision to organize a homeschooling “pod” – a modern version of a one-room schoolhouse, with a small group of parents splitting the cost of hiring teachers – wasn’t done lightly.

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the nation, she’s grown increasingly wary about her public school’s plan for getting kids back in the building.

“I don’t think it’s a great idea to send your kids to school in the middle of the pandemic,” says Mulligan, 40. “A lot of us started freaking out.”

At the same time, she adds, she and her husband found it difficult this spring to juggle working from home while managing their 6-year-old daughter’s virtual schooling. That experience, plus concerns about school safety, prompted her family to connect with four other families in their hometown of Alexandria, Virginia, to create a homeschooling “pod.” Mulligan plans on hiring a teacher to

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Here’s how to help your student

Elva Mankin

Hoping to help your fourth-grader with reading and writing skills? Here are some basic tips that experts suggest for any fourth-grader.

Encourage reading

Find ways to encourage your child to read independently. Make sure that they have the time and space to devote to reading and that they have plenty of material to read for fun. Take your child to the library regularly.

Related: In fourth grade, children focus on reading and understanding challenging fiction and non-fiction texts.

Use technology to encourage reading

Learn how to use technology to help develop your fourth-grader’s growing interest in reading. There is a large selection of online books for children, many with interactive features such as animations or voice recording. You can also encourage their interest in reading by helping him find online sites about topics that interest him.

Discuss what your child is reading

Ask your child about the books they are

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Here’s why COVID-19 has made arts education so problematic

Elva Mankin

Arianna Carson, who plans to study dance at SUNY Purchase in the fall, is photographed near her home in Rowland Heights on July 6, 2020. <span class="copyright">(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Arianna Carson, who plans to study dance at SUNY Purchase in the fall, is photographed near her home in Rowland Heights on July 6, 2020. (Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

As a dance student at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, Arianna Carson’s meticulously scheduled days often began at 5:15 am.

After commuting downtown to school, the 18-year-old spent the day balancing academic and dance classes. In the evenings, she would rehearse even more at a dance studio in Whittier until 9:30 p.m. By the time she began homework, it was usually around midnight.

When the pandemic forced her to take classes online, she transitioned her dance training to her living room and backyard.

The jam-packed days were crafted around Carson’s dream to become a professional modern dancer. She is scheduled to start this fall at SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Dance in New York, even though

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Here’s Where You Can Buy Non-Medical Face Masks Online Right Now

Elva Mankin

Update, June 24, 2020: Since communities in the United States resume holding public events such as protests and political rallies, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released new guidelines defining these sorts of gatherings as high risk. In situations where maintaining physical distance is difficult, the CDC says cloth face coverings are “most essential” and should be worn by both event staff and attendees.

Update, May 6, 2020: As stay-at-home orders come to an end and businesses across the U.S. begin to re-open, a number of states are taking the CDC’s recommendation to wear a cloth face-covering in public to the next level by making it a requirement. This is in effect in the following seven states so far: New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Rhode Island, and Hawaii.

Update, April 4, 2020: The CDC issued a recommendation that President Donald Trump shared on Friday:

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Elon Musk’s net worth just hit $70.5 billion, surpassing Warren Buffett’s. Here’s how the billionaire Tesla and SpaceX CEO went from getting bullied as a child to becoming one of the most successful and controversial men in tech.

Elva Mankin

Elon Musk.
Elon Musk.

Steve Nesius/Reuters

  • Elon Musk has had a tumultuous yet successful life. 

  • He was bullied as a child but ultimately attended an Ivy League university, going on to become the CEO of two companies, Tesla and SpaceX, and the founder of three more.

  • He’s also been married three times and has triplets and twins. He just had another baby with his girlfriend, the musician Grimes. 

  • But Musk also courts controversy, especially on Twitter. The tech billionaire has been outspoken about the coronavirus crisis, questioning the severity of the outbreak and urging for business to resume.

  • Now, Musk has hit a new milestone: as Tesla’s stock hit an all-time high, Musk’s wealth surged to $70.5 billion.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

It seems like there’s nothing Elon Musk can’t do. 

As CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, founder of The Boring Company, and cofounder of OpenAI and Neuralink, Musk

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