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The Best Face Masks for Running, Cycling and Working Out

While some cities have started reopening shops and restaurants, the majority of the country is still observing quarantine procedures that were put in place to help curb the spread of the coronavirus. One such measure that’s still in place is the wearing of face masks when out in public, with the CDC recommending cloth face coverings to help prevent the transmission of germs and viruses.

But while cloth face masks can keep you shielded on a walk, or quick trip to the grocery store, not all of these masks are designed for physical activity. Generic cloth masks aren’t always breathable, and worse, they can irritate or chaff the skin. They’re often heavy and saggy, and can fall off if not secured tightly, defeating the whole point of wearing a mask in the first place.

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Luckily, a number of manufacturers are now designing face masks specifically for

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Tech giants Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon to face Congress

Unprecedented is a dangerous word in journalism, but this really hasn’t happened before.

On Wednesday, four of the biggest names in tech will give evidence to members of the US Congress.

Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), Sundar Pichai (Google), Tim Cook (Apple) and Jeff Bezos (Amazon) will all be grilled.

Jeff Bezos – the world’s richest man – has never testified before either house. They have never all been quizzed together.

How these tech bosses do, how they stand up to scrutiny, could be a defining moment in their future relationship with government.

Central to the interrogation will be whether these tech giants are simply too big.

The Covid pandemic has put this into sharp focus. Where other companies have struggled, Big Tech companies have thrived. Together they are now worth $5tn dollars. It’s led to accusations that – just like the banks – they are simply too big to fail.

The

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Fintechs face pressure to grow up as coronavirus casts a chill

By Iain Withers, Anna Irrera and Tom Wilson

LONDON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – Aritra Chakravarty, founder of London-based online accounts and investments provider Dozens, admits it’s a tough time to be seeking up to 15 million pounds ($19 million) for a start-up.

“It’s definitely a bearish market” said Chakravarty, who is seeking funding for Project Imagine, the company behind his fintech ventures. He is looking to crowd funding and government-backed COVID 19-support schemes for technology firms to make up for any reticence from venture capital investors.

Data suggest his caution is warranted. Fintechs, which have been one of the hottest draws for venture capitalists in recent years, raised $6.3 billion in the second quarter, down 41% on the year, according to data from analysts at Forrester shared with Reuters.

Investors and entrepreneurs say that while the COVID-19 pandemic has boosted demand for fintechs in areas such as digital payments and online

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200 allegations of sexual misconduct in gaming were revealed in a recent spreadsheet. Streamers say it reflects sexism they face every day.

Women who stream on Twitch say the gaming landscape remains sexist and leads to harassment.
Women who stream on Twitch say the gaming landscape remains sexist and leads to harassment.

Leonardo Alvarez Hernandez/Getty Images

  • Recent allegations of sexual misconduct have rocked the gaming world.

  • Several women who use the popular livestreaming platform Twitch told Insider that the allegations represented a larger problem of sexism in the gaming world that makes harassment exceedingly common.

  • Though women are continually challenging the male gamer stereotype, research has found that sexism persists in gaming.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In June, dozens of women in gaming made waves with allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct against popular streamers as part of a new wave of the #MeToo movement that’s stretched across industries, indicting actors, media professionals, influencers, and more.

Most of those accused of misconduct in gaming were personalities on Amazon’s Twitch, the largest game-streaming platform.

As more details came out on various platforms, Jessica Richey, who streams

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Here’s Where You Can Buy Non-Medical Face Masks Online Right Now

Update, June 24, 2020: Since communities in the United States resume holding public events such as protests and political rallies, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released new guidelines defining these sorts of gatherings as high risk. In situations where maintaining physical distance is difficult, the CDC says cloth face coverings are “most essential” and should be worn by both event staff and attendees.

Update, May 6, 2020: As stay-at-home orders come to an end and businesses across the U.S. begin to re-open, a number of states are taking the CDC’s recommendation to wear a cloth face-covering in public to the next level by making it a requirement. This is in effect in the following seven states so far: New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Rhode Island, and Hawaii.

Update, April 4, 2020: The CDC issued a recommendation that President Donald Trump shared on Friday:

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Pandemic Changes the Face of Pop-Ups

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As retail reopens around the U.S., pop-ups are popping up more than ever.

For the past few years, these temporary retail spaces were all the rage for companies seeking a relatively inexpensive way to test the brick-and-mortar waters. The strategy was so successful with both brands and landlords that pop-ups were pervasive on seemingly every street in urban areas around the country.

Then the pandemic hit and all retail locations were forced to close, including pop-ups. Now that brick-and-mortar sites have begun reopening, the landscape is markedly different. Consumers are still wary of going back to stores as the coronavirus continues to have a profound effect on the way we live our lives. Retailers have had to institute wide-scale changes in how they operate to convince customers that it’s safe for them to return — masks, gloves, Plexiglass shields, constant disinfecting of high-touch

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International Students in the U.S. Could Face ‘Devastating Upheaval’ in Wake of ICE Guidance for Foreign Students to Leave if Schools Are Online-Only

On her birthday, Justine learned that her future as a student in the U.S., and the futures of hundreds of thousands of international students like her — may be in jeopardy. New federal guidance announced Monday that international students will be required to leave the U.S. if their schools switch to an all-online curriculum amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Students already residing in the U.S. have been thrust into panic and uncertainty. “We’ve uprooted our entire lives to be here,” Justine says. She asked for her full name to be withheld because of fears about her immigration status. “The fact that it’s not coordinated and it’s not consistent messaging is very distressing for us and for our families.”

The new U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) guidance, states that international students on F-1 and M-1 visas “may not take a full online course load and remain” in the U.S. — posing

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Foreign College Students Must Take In-Person Classes Or Face Deportation, ICE Says

International students studying in the U.S. must leave the country or switch schools if they attend a university that will hold classes entirely online this fall due to the coronavirus pandemic, government officials said Monday.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced the measure as cases of the virus continue to surge in most states around the country and many colleges and universities are still figuring out how or if they can reopen for the fall term.

“Active students currently in the United States enrolled in such programs must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status,” the agency said Monday, noting the shift applies to F-1 and M-1 visa holders. “If not, they may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.”

The change will not impact international students who take classes

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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