COVID19

Aeffe Takes Action to Contrast COVID-19 Effects in First Half

MILAN – Cost containment, more efficient working capital management, more focused collections in line with market changes and the development of its online business are part of Aeffe’s Action Plan to contrast the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, which dragged down earnings and revenues in the first half of the year.

The Italian fashion group reported a net loss of 10.9 million euros for the six months ended June 30, compared with a net profit of 5.1 million euros in the same period last year.

In the first half, revenues totaled 118.9 million euros, down 31.4 percent compared with 173.3 million euros last year, hurt by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic at its retail and wholesale channels.

Aeffe controls the Alberta Ferretti, Moschino, Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini and Pollini brands.

Sales of the ready-to-wear division totaled 88.6 million euros, falling 33 percent, while the revenues of the footwear and

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Businesses pivot to meet the demand for COVID-19 disinfection

MILWAUKEE – As more people are allowed back into offices, restaurants and hotels under the City of Milwaukee’s re-opening plans, the need for disinfection is greater than ever.

Pest 2 Rest Pest Control, a family-owned extermination company, is one of the many businesses that now specialize in COVID-19 disinfection.

“There is a 0.1% difference between sanitizing and disinfecting,” said Jeffery Hardy Sr., the co-owner of Pest 2 Rest. “So, sanitizing, you’re cleaning; disinfecting, you’re killing the virus. And that’s what we’re encouraging people to do.”

He also encourages clients to have a plan of action after his job is done.

Hardy’s business, as its name would suggest, started out killing bed bugs, roaches, rodents and other critters. Since March, Hardy chose to pivot like many other entrepreneurs. Now, he and his wife, Brenda, and sometimes their three kids as well, spray interiors to rid keyboards, desks and doorknobs of the

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Online education was a mess in the spring. As COVID-19 prompts schools to stay virtual, will it get better this fall?

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced Chicago Public Schools to make a hurried switch to remote instruction earlier this year, Lidia Muro said it didn’t work out so well for her 5-year-old stepson Elijah, then a kindergartner at Marvin Camras Elementary.

Some of the schoolwork he was given required logins and passwords his parents didn’t receive, she said. Communication with his teacher was lacking. And while it took Elijah a single day to finish math lessons that were supposed to stretch over months, he fell behind in reading.

“The program was mostly games, I think,” Muro said. “Educational games are good, but (children) can only do games for so long.”

Contrast that with the experience of Wauconda High School junior-to-be Tori Mraz. She found her school’s online classes to be rigorous but flexible, and while a lack of face-to-face instruction created challenges, she gave virtual education high marks.

“I did really

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Cash and 21 Other Everyday Things Wiped Out by COVID-19

The coronavirus pandemic has radically altered nearly every aspect of everyday life that people once took for granted. Activities and commodities that were standard just a handful of months ago have become scarce, if not impossible to access. Everything from paper money and coins to buffet restaurants and live concerts are becoming dim and distant memories for Americans. It’s quite possible that future generations won’t recognize a handshake or any of these 21 other items that are disappearing rapidly.

Long before COVID-19 battered the globe, e-commerce and the proliferation of payment apps have been replacing cash transactions. According to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., cash represented just 30% of all payments in 2017. The fear of handling paper money contaminated with the coronavirus has accelerated the digital marketplace. With so many brick-and-mortar businesses closed, there’s a tremendous decrease in in-person transactions.

“Prior to the COVID-19 epidemic, about one-third of Americans … Read More

Here’s why COVID-19 has made arts education so problematic

Arianna Carson, who plans to study dance at SUNY Purchase in the fall, is photographed near her home in Rowland Heights on July 6, 2020. <span class="copyright">(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Arianna Carson, who plans to study dance at SUNY Purchase in the fall, is photographed near her home in Rowland Heights on July 6, 2020. (Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

As a dance student at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, Arianna Carson’s meticulously scheduled days often began at 5:15 am.

After commuting downtown to school, the 18-year-old spent the day balancing academic and dance classes. In the evenings, she would rehearse even more at a dance studio in Whittier until 9:30 p.m. By the time she began homework, it was usually around midnight.

When the pandemic forced her to take classes online, she transitioned her dance training to her living room and backyard.

The jam-packed days were crafted around Carson’s dream to become a professional modern dancer. She is scheduled to start this fall at SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Dance in New York, even though

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Will COVID-19 Adaptations Create a More Disability-Inclusive World?

Video conferencing at home.
Video conferencing at home.

I have always been a fan of Charles Darwin. In my sixth-grade biology class, adaptation was taught as a concept that grew into Darwin’s theory of natural selection — but for me, it had a different meaning. It was the first time I learned there was a name for everything I had always done since birth. Growing up with a neuromuscular disease meant that adaptation was built into every part of my existence. As a lifetime wheelchair user, I learned at a young age that adaptation was a critical part of my ability to fit into an able-bodied world that wasn’t designed for me.

With the rise of COVID-19 and the drastic changes our world has experienced over the last several months, my intrinsic sense of adaptation has been adopted by the world at large. This pandemic is arguably one of the most significant periods in

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We Need to Change How We Share Our Personal Data Online in the Age of COVID-19

A few months into the coronavirus pandemic, the web is more central to humanity’s functioning than I could have imagined 30 years ago. It’s now a lifeline for billions of people and businesses worldwide. But I’m more frustrated now with the current state of the web than ever before. We could be doing so much better.

COVID-19 underscores how urgently we need a new approach to organizing and sharing personal data. You only have to look at the limited scope and the widespread adoption challenges of the pandemic apps offered by various tech companies and governments.

Think of all the data about your life accumulated in the various applications you use – social gatherings, frequent contacts, recent travel, health, fitness, photos, and so on. Why is it that none of that information can be combined and used to help you, especially during a crisis?

It’s because you aren’t in control

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As COVID-19 Continues to Fuel E-commerce, Buy Now, Pay Later Programs Evolve

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According to CB Insights, there are 67 fintech unicorns with a combined valuation of $252.6 billion. And notably, standouts from this list include “buy now, pay later” companies who, as e-commerce continues to rise during the coronavirus pandemic, have experienced exponential sales.

In May, PayPal reported having 325 million active accounts, having gained 7.5 million new accounts in April alone. And in June, the company announced it has expanded its buy now, pay later solutions to France making it one of the first payment installment solutions for small businesses in France. According to data from PayPal, 84 percent of French consumers are more likely to shop again at a retailer that offers installments.

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Splitit also achieved record growth during the pandemic, achieving increased conversion and average order value as online shopping rates soared. On July 8, the company announced it

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Connecticut preparing for all schools to open, but state planning for online education if COVID-19 surges. Final decision will be made in a month, Gov. Lamont says.

Connecticut is preparing for three different scenarios for the opening of schools and a final decision on how education will look will be made in a month, Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday.

Educators and the state are planning for all learning to take place in schools, but that could be modified to a mix of online and in-class learning or, if there is a coronavirus surge, all education will shift to at-home learning.

“Things change,‘’ Gov. Lamont said at his afternoon COVID-19 briefing, noting that San Diego and Los Angeles decided Monday to shift to an online learning model. “We still have very low metrics compared to San Diego and Los Angeles and most of these other states.”

How schools look “is going to be subject to where we are a month from now,‘’ Lamont said.

Fran Rabinowitz, executive director of the Connecticut Assoociation of Public School Superintendents, said that

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Lawmakers request monthly COVID-19 misinformation reports from online platforms

“Over the past several months, we have seen a troubling rise of false or misleading information related to COVID-19 disseminated by domestic and foreign actors on platforms such as yours. This disinformation has ranged from false statements about certain groups being immune from contracting the virus to unsubstantiated assertions about masks and vaccines. This type of disinformation is dangerous and can affect the health and well-being of people who use this false information to make critical health decisions during this pandemic.”

The tech giants reportedly agreed to provide the European Commission with detailed monthly disinformation reports back in June, and that’s something the lawmakers noted in their letters. “[W]e request that your company provide the Committee with monthly reports similar in scope to what you are providing the European Commission regarding your COVID-19 disinformation efforts as they relate to United States users of your platform,” they added.

There are plenty

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