Fall 2020 Reopening Plans At The Top 100 U.S. Business Schools

Elva Mankin

They’ll be following all the rules this fall at the University of Michigan: masks, social distancing, smaller class sizes, frequent hand and surface washing, and more — much more. They’ll also be pioneering new rules for a new reality, particularly in the realm of remote instruction, as befits one of the country’s leading centers of social and cultural innovation. Put it all together and Scott DeRue, dean of the Ross School of Business, expects a memorable term.

“As with every year, I’m looking forward to welcoming students back to campus safely for a very successful fall term,” DeRue says. “Of course, I also recognize the profound difficulties that many of our students face in this moment, and that much uncertainty remains for all of us. We will get through this, and we will do it together.”

Five months after it shut down business school campuses and curtailed spring instruction and … Read More

How YouTube’s bias algorithm hurts those looking for information on health

Elva Mankin

YouTube hosts millions of videos related to health care.

The Health Information National Trends Survey reports that 75% of Americans go to the internet first when looking for information about health or medical topics. YouTube is one of the most popular online platforms, with billions of views every day, and has emerged as a significant source of health information.

Several public health agencies, such as state health departments, have invested resources in YouTube as a channel for health communication. Patients with chronic health conditions especially rely on social media, including YouTube videos, to learn more about how to manage their conditions.

But video recommendations on such sites could exacerbate preexisting disparities in health.

A significant fraction of the U.S. population is estimated to have limited health literacy, or the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information, such as the ability to read and comprehend prescription bottles, appointment slips

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Which Online Bank Is Right for You?

Elva Mankin

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Online-only banks are attractive to anyone looking for a simple and convenient banking solution.

While most traditional branch banks offer online banking and mobile apps, digital banking platforms tend to blow them out of the water in user experience and convenience — because they’re created by technology companies.

These companies let you access the products and services you’re used to from traditional banks, but they layer on features through robust apps to help you simplify your life and work toward financial goals.

As the landscape for online banks becomes increasingly competitive, digital banking apps look more and more similar — but each stands out through unique features designed for specific lifestyles and financial goals.

Two leading players in the online

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Adding a 3-D Printer to the Garage Might Finally Make Sense

Elva Mankin

From Car and Driver

The gentleman who sold me my first car, a 1969 Datsun 2000, asked me to cup my hands as he poured out a jumble of letters. I dropped them onto the faded yellow hood of the roadster and arranged them: D-A-T-S-U-N. They likely cost pennies to produce, but they were priceless to me, even the T with missing a nib that would make attaching it to the car difficult. If I lost any of these letters in 1989, that was it. I had no way to replace them. I couldn’t scour online auctions, because those didn’t exist. While there were far more Datsuns on the road in the ’80s than there are now, it was unlikely anyone else near me would part with their precious portions of the alphabet. And don’t even get me started on the anxiety I had about losing the “Datsun” and “2000”

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Colleges win immigration battle but fear for US reputation

Elva Mankin

Even with a fresh victory on behalf of international students, U.S. universities fear they’re losing a broader fight over the nation’s reputation as a place that embraces and fosters the world’s best scholars.

University leaders see it as a steady erosion. They say the Trump administration’s repeated attempts to curb immigration have sent students a message that they aren’t welcome in the United States. Colleges say foreign students are listening: Since President Donald Trump was elected in 2016, the number of new international students coming to the U.S. has fallen by 10% after years of growth.

Already, there’s concern that the coronavirus pandemic and a slowdown of visa processing could prevent thousands of students from returning this fall. Foreign students now face even more uncertainty after seeing how quickly policies can change, and on nothing more than a political whim, said Kim Wilcox, chancellor of the University of California, Riverside.

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Will COVID-19 Adaptations Create a More Disability-Inclusive World?

Elva Mankin

Video conferencing at home.
Video conferencing at home.

I have always been a fan of Charles Darwin. In my sixth-grade biology class, adaptation was taught as a concept that grew into Darwin’s theory of natural selection — but for me, it had a different meaning. It was the first time I learned there was a name for everything I had always done since birth. Growing up with a neuromuscular disease meant that adaptation was built into every part of my existence. As a lifetime wheelchair user, I learned at a young age that adaptation was a critical part of my ability to fit into an able-bodied world that wasn’t designed for me.

With the rise of COVID-19 and the drastic changes our world has experienced over the last several months, my intrinsic sense of adaptation has been adopted by the world at large. This pandemic is arguably one of the most significant periods in

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With Bronco, F-150, and Mustang Mach-E, Ford’s Future Comes Into View

Elva Mankin

From Car and Driver

At the Detroit Auto Show in 2016, Ford used its press conference not to launch a car (as is traditional) but to proclaim its intent to transition from being an automotive company to an auto and mobility company. The service they launched that day, called FordPass, has yet to revolutionize the automotive experience. But the last six months at Ford have proved it is still interested in diversifying. The debuts of the Mustang Mach-E, F-150, and the revived Bronco, plus a leadership change that elevated Jim Farley, former head of new business, technology, and strategy, signal that Ford is getting serious about becoming more than just a car company.

Those three launches were important to the company for all the usual reasons (continued revenue, the chance to be better than Ram again, etc.), but they also serve as clear signals that Ford is finally in the

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What’s different about the 2020 Census?

Elva Mankin

The U.S. Constitution mandates that every 10 years the Census Bureau count every person living in the United States. The results have huge consequences and are used to draw congressional districts and allocate federal funding for things like education, hospitals, roads, Medicare, and Medicaid.

The census has continuously adopted new technological tools to make the process easier, cheaper, and more accurate. In 1890, census takers made use of some of the first tabulating machines, and the Census Bureau purchased UNIVAC I, the first computer commercially available for civilian use, in 1951.

This year, for the first time, the bureau is aiming to go predominantly digital. The biggest motivation: cost savings. According to the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), the cost of the census has doubled on average every decade since 1970. The cost for 2010 was $12.3 billion. This year, digital improvements have helped the Census Bureau save on address

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Hot sleeper? Cool off (in bed) with this secret way to save $350

Elva Mankin

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Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)
Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)

Waking up in the middle of the night is always annoying—but when a drenched set of sheets is your alarm clock, it’s truly a nightmare. Night sweats are real, and they’re really uncomfortable. No amount of air conditioning will solve the problem, either. What works is breathable bedding and a cooling mattress that absorbs heat and regulates your temperature while you sleep.

Since mattress stores are pretty much off-limits these days, now is the perfect time to purchase the cooling mattress of your dreams online. Casper, the undisputed champion in the bed-in-a-box universe, is also an ace at

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As churches reopen, outbreaks are sprouting and some are keeping doors shut

Elva Mankin

At a church in Sacramento, California, that has been closed for in-person services since March, congregants occasionally still stop by to pray outside and try to capture a sense of fellowship they dearly miss.

In Nashville, Tennessee, the pastor of an Anglican church has been handing out Communion in the parking lot for weeks.

South of Atlanta, the animated pastor of a 3,000-member congregation tries to summon every ounce of enthusiasm in his body to deliver a lively, music-filled service in front of a live audience of no one, hoping his message and spirit come through on various technology platforms.

None of those are ideal options, but they beat becoming the source of an outbreak of COVID-19.

Almost 40 places of worship and religious events have been linked to more than 650 U.S. cases of the coronavirus since the pandemic began, according to tracking by the New York Times. Along

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