Duke Realty Signs Lease with Optoro, Facility 100% Occupied

Elva Mankin

Duke Realty Corp. DRE has been witnessing solid demand for its logistic facilities in the Nashville metro area. The company recently clinched a lease deal for 207,518 square feet of space in Park 840 West 14840 in Lebanon, TN, with the returns technology company Optoro, Inc.

With the latest lease, this 653,460-square-foot logistics building, which is just off I-840 at Highway 109, has achieved full occupancy. It highlights the elevated demand for modern Class A facilities. With the property being positioned east of downtown Nashville and within minutes of I-40, I-24 and I-65, it serves as an efficient and convenient one for making distribution throughout the Southern United States as well as the rest of the nation.

Amid the e-commerce boom, the industrial real estate asset category has continued to play a key role, transforming the way how consumers shop and receive their goods. Services like same-day delivery are gaining

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who is in the race to buy the Chinese app?

Elva Mankin

TikTok
TikTok

Before there was TikTok, there was Vine. The American-founded, short-form video app was used at the height of its popularity by more than 200 million people, letting them create seven second looping videos featuring music and comedy. A bit like TikTok. 

In January 2017, however, the app met an untimely end after being shut down for good by Twitter, who had bought the company for a reported $30m (£23m) in October 2012.

Three years on from its failed Vine venture, Twitter has found itself in the running to buy TikTok, an app seen by many as a successor to Vine.

TikTok, owned by Chinese technology giant Bytedance, has exploded in popularity with 800m users globally, the vast majority of which are teens flocking to the app for short clips of dance routines and lip-synced comedy sketches.

Twitter’s potential bid comes as TikTok’s future rests on a knife edge. Last

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‘Stock take’ of digital world is long overdue, says Molly Russell’s father

Elva Mankin

Molly Russell - PA
Molly Russell – PA

A “stocktake” of the digital world is long overdue, the father of Molly Russell has urged, as he pledges his support for a new consultation into online harms.

The campaigner claims that graphic self-harm images on Instagram played a role in his daughter’s suicide and wants the internet to be a “safer place” for young and vulnerable people.

Ian Russell said: “Today’s current big tech platforms were born at about the same time as my youngest daughter, Molly. The powerful tech corporations live on, sadly Molly ended her own life in 2017, and I am convinced what she found online helped kill her.”

Writing for The Telegraph, the founder of the Molly Rose Foundation backs Labour’s new Our Digital Future consultation.

The review, which launches on Tuesday, will examine children’s safety, hate speech and the spread of disinformation online.

 

“The consultation will help the UK become

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Will the coronavirus pandemic end snow days forever?

Elva Mankin

Are there any two words more beloved by children than “snow day”?

If you grew up in a region of the country where flakes fall and blizzards come to town, then you no doubt remember that feeling of sheer, unadulterated glee when you found out school was canceled due to snow.

Who doesn’t recall being shaken from their slumber when the phone rang at 5 a.m. with a monotonous school recording informing parents that school will be closed that day? And who can forget trying to go back to sleep knowing there’s no school? The budding excitement over knowing what lies ahead on such a magical day kept us all awake.

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And, if that call never came, you’d keep your fingers crossed when you woke up that your school would be listed as closed

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Quantum computing breakthrough as scientists find possible solution to technology’s biggest hurdle

Elva Mankin

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in the development of large-scale quantum computers.

“Noise” remains the biggest problem for the development of quantum computers, and must be solved before they can be used widely and in the revolutionary ways that have been proposed. The new paper suggests a way of dealing with such noise, in turn potentially opening up a way to control that noise and develop much better quantum computing systems.

Quantum computers could potentially change the way we use technology, by allowing for the solving of problems that are impossible using today’s computers. But, to do so, they need weak enough noise as to be reliable.

The problem of noise remains central to creating working and useful quantum computers. In short, it is a result of the errors that are introduced as quantum scientists manipulate the “qubits” that power a quantum computer, and so that noise must be

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Technology to Play Increasing Role in Film Festivals and Markets, Locarno Panelists Say

Elva Mankin

Day three of the Locarno Film Festival StepIn 2020, moderated by Variety‘s Leo Barraclough and hosted by the Variety Streaming Room platform, brought professionals from various parts of the film festival and market sectors together for a panel on the Future of Film Festivals and Film Markets.

Jérôme Paillard, executive director of Cannes Film Market; Lili Hinstin, artistic director of the Locarno Film Festival; Alberto Barbera, artistic director of the Venice Film Festival; Sarah Schweitzman, from CAA’s Film Finance and Sales Group, which helped set up the agency-led virtual film market at Cannes; and Tabitha Jackson, director of Sundance Film Festival, made up the panel’s members.

More from Variety

As many events this year have gone virtual on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, some film festivals also had to adapt and utilize online platforms, including Cannes. The panelists noted that the virtual route has so far offered both positive

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Why Everyone Wants A Piece Of Shift72, Which Has Grown By 400% During The Pandemic

Elva Mankin

Many film companies have taken a battering during the pandemic. The opposite is true of Shift72.

Business for the New Zealand-based company, which builds and manages online video platforms for the industry, is “through the roof”, with new U.S. and international clients including major festivals and exhibitors and with interest growing among independent distribution companies.

More from Deadline

During the pandemic, the company has grown as festivals look to become hybrid online/physical events and some explore becoming year-round TVOD platforms and a viable home for PVOD releases for non-blockbuster titles. The company’s ScreenPlus label, which builds TVOD and PVOD platforms for exhibition chains, has seen business off the back of the AMC/Universal window crunch deal as cinemas move to future proof as best they can.

CEO David White founded Shift72 in 2008 with a background in online and traditional distribution and film marketing. Alongside him at the firm is company

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Is this new online-only private school the future of education?

Elva Mankin

boy studies on laptop
boy studies on laptop

As a parent of a teen facing her final year of GCSE study after months out of school – often with patchy teaching – I’m feeling decidedly nervous. Although the Government has promised to open schools in September, a new study says a lack of an effective track and trace system means this might not be safe. Adding to the chaos, a dreaded ‘second wave’ of COVID-19 may also lead to unpredictable local or national lockdowns. It’s not just parents like me who are concerned. As Scottish children mourn their disappointing GCSE grades, a new study, Life After Lockdown, from the nation’s leading youth programme NCS (National Citizen Service) has found that 67 per cent of teens aged 16-17 are worried about their education.  

The result? More and more parents are looking for alternatives to traditional schools. 

Across the UK, Google searches for the term’ online

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25 Ways To Make an Extra $500 a Month

Elva Mankin

In times of economic crisis, every last dollar counts. No matter how much the coronavirus pandemic has affected your income, it’s always a good idea to sock away some extra money if you can. Even if you’re working 40 hours a week at a full-time job, there are things you can do to earn a few extra hundred dollars per month. Although everyone’s life is different and some of these ideas might only be possible when cities start to reopen more, there are likely at least a few options that can give you a bit of breathing room when it comes to finances.

Last updated: May 27, 2020

Rent Out Possessions

  • About $706 per month for car rental, on average via Turo

If you’ve got assets that you don’t want to sell but may not be currently using, consider renting them out. Thanks to the access the internet provides, it’s

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Pandemic to Create Strong Headwinds Against Holiday Spending This Year

Elva Mankin

With consumer behavior changing rapidly due to unprecedented times, industry experts and consultants expect this holiday shopping season to be a far cry from those past.

Due to the pandemic, consumers have experienced a vast amount of uncertainty — leading to fear, anxiety and conservative spending.

“Over 40 percent of Millennial and Gen Z shoppers expect to spend less this year, with a greater proportion of younger shoppers indicating this compared to older Millennials, according to our survey,” said Deborah Weinswig, chief executive officer and founder of Coresight Research, a global advisory and research firm specializing in retail and technology. “Younger shoppers are early on their jobs or are recent graduates and will be heading into the holiday season with a lower propensity to spend, given their low incomes compared to older shoppers. Savings rates in the U.S. are also on the rise, and younger shoppers are likely to want

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