Day: July 6, 2020

What Is Yield Farming? The Rocket Fuel of DeFi, Explained

It’s effectively July 2017 in the world of decentralized finance (DeFi), and as in the heady days of the initial coin offering (ICO) boom, the numbers are only trending up.

According to DeFi Pulse, there is $1.9 billion in crypto assets locked in DeFi right now. According to the CoinDesk ICO Tracker, the ICO market started chugging past $1 billion in July 2017, just a few months before token sales started getting talked about on TV.

Debate juxtaposing these numbers if you like, but what no one can question is this: Crypto users are putting more and more value to work in DeFi applications, driven largely by the introduction of a whole new yield-generating pasture, Compound’s COMP governance token.

Governance tokens enable users to vote on the future of decentralized protocols, sure, but they also present fresh ways for DeFi founders to entice assets onto their platforms.

That said, it’s … Read More

First MFA Textiles Graduates at Parsons Are Multidisciplinary, Ready for New Challenges In and Out of Fashion

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Three years after embarking on the MFA Textile program at The New School’s Parsons School of Design, the inaugural graduates were not about to let the pandemic lockdown dampen their imaginative ideas.

Each of the 16 graduates have created textiles that intersect craft, technology and sustainability. “I’m so proud and I’m so sad. I’m incredibly impressed by their attitude and endurance. And the way they handled COVID-19 was so positive and so mature. They were also strong,” said Li Edelkoort, who envisioned the MFA Textiles program in 2015.

It launched three years later under the leadership of program director Preeti Gopinath. After stay-at-home mandates required students to exit the classroom, Edelkoort kept up contact online. “They were all in their own houses and apartments with dogs and husbands and boyfriends and roommates — often in very small spaces. They knew how to adapt

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Telehealth called a ‘silver lining’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. This time, it might stick

Telehealth use surged from 8% of Americans in December to 29% in May as primary care and mental health physicians and specialists turned to remote care out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a UnitedHealth Group report.

Telehealth evangelists long have touted using high-speed internet connections and a range of devices to link providers and patients for remote care. But regulatory hurdles and medicine’s conservative culture limited virtual checkups to largely minor conditions such as sinus infections or unique circumstances such as connecting neurologists to rural hospitals that lack specialized care.

The pandemic lockdowns closed doctors’ offices and delayed nonemergency care for millions of Americans. Some clinics scrambled to acquire technology platforms to deliver remote care. Others employed rarely used video programs to reach patients in their homes.

Remote visits among Medicare patients surged through the end of March, prompting Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Director Seema

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3 Cybersecurity Stocks to Watch

Organizations across the world have been fretting over the issue of cybersecurity for long. The ever-evolving nature of cyberattacks makes it difficult for organizations to keep pace. Cyberattacks are responsible for massive losses and are likely to cost companies almost $5.2 trillion annually, per Absolute Markets Insights data.

Cybercriminals use various ways to attack systems, including ransomware, denial-of-service, SQL injection attack, etc. Notably, ransomware is the most profitable malware, causing maximum financial damages to an individual or organization. It infects a computer to encrypt files or systems. Typically, the victim has to cough up a ransom amount for data retrieval.

Markedly, per Coveware, ransomware is estimated to have caused global damage worth $11.5 billion to organizations in 2019.

We had got an idea about the gravity of damages caused by a ransomware when organizations were affected by two back-to-back ransomware attacks — WannaCry in May and Petya in June 2017.

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5 Best Stocks of Q2 With Double-Digit Growth Potential

Wall Street wrapped up its best quarterly performance in decades buoyed by a combination of unprecedented levels of fiscal and monetary stimulus, a technology sector boom, hopes of a coronavirus vaccine and easing of lockdown measures.

Nasdaq outperformed, having climbed 30.6% — the best since fourth quarter 1999. The S&P 500 and Dow Jones gained 20% and 17.8%, respectively. The former had its biggest single-quarter surge since 1998 and the latter logged in the best quarter since 1987. This marks an impressive comeback for the stocks from the worst first quarter since the 2008 financial crisis due to the coronavirus pandemic, which had halted economic activities and resulted in millions of people losing their jobs.

In fact, the impressive gains came despite the resurgence in coronavirus infections in some parts of the United Sates after reopening. Per the latest report, the United States has recorded nearly 156,000 new coronavirus cases

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LVMH’s Ian Rogers Flags Upcoming Artificial Intelligence Push

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PARIS — The coronavirus crisis has everyone going digital full-throttle — including specialists in the realm. This year, following widespread store closures, it’s been all about bulking up e-commerce services — on the double. But next up, the focus will be on artificial intelligence, according to Ian Rogers, chief digital officer at LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, who spoke to WWD through Zoom.

“We talk a lot about data and artificial intelligence, I think you’ll see us talk more about that — if we were at VivaTech this year, our theme would be artificial intelligence,” he said, referring to the French technology fair that was canceled this year.

The executive normally reveals winners of the annual LVMH Innovation Prize at the VivaTech fair, which is France’s equivalent to the Las Vegas Consumer Electronics Show, drawing industry heavyweights such as Alibaba chairman and cofounder

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4 Large-Cap Technology Stocks to Buy This Earnings Season

Lockdown impositions across the world, in a bid to curb the spread of COVID-19, have been taking a toll on the economy. The pandemic has caused disruptions in major sectors and economic zones, resulting in a full-blown global crisis due to the slowdown in productions and operations, and sluggish spending patterns.

As a result, second-quarter corporate earnings are expected to have suffered significantly. According to the latest Zacks Earnings Preview article, total earnings for the S&P 500 members will likely be down 44.1% year over year on 10.9% lower revenues in the to-be-reported quarter.

Though the coronavirus outbreak has had a sector-wide impact, the U.S. tech sector seems more resilient compared with the other sectors. Per the Earnings Preview article, tech sector earnings are expected to decline 13.5% on 1.2% lower revenues.

Why Tech Sector Could Outshine in Q2?

The coronavirus outbreak has, surprisingly, opened up newer avenues of growth

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One in seven young women receive revenge porn threats, finds Refuge survey

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

One in seven young women have received threats that intimate photographs of them will be shared without their consent, according to a new survey.

Domestic violence charity Refuge conducted a survey of 2,060 people, including 282 women aged 18-34, and found that this age range are twice as likely than the general population to have sexual photos of themselves used against them as revenge porn.

Revenge porn – the act of “sharing private sexual materials with intent to cause distress” – has been illegal in England and Wales since 2015. In July 2017, it was announced it had become a criminal offence in Scotland, with perpetrators at risk of spending up to five years in prison.

The survey showed that of the one in 14 women overall who had been threatened with revenge porn, 72 per cent were threatened by a current or former partner and of these

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Will the Facebook advertising boycott force the social media giant to change? Not likely

Hundreds of advertisers say they won’t spend money on Facebook in July or beyond over concerns the social media company isn’t doing enough to stop hate speech.  But the exodus of spenders may not be enough to push CEO Mark Zuckerberg to make the level of change that critics are demanding. 

Critics have an initial list of 10 recommendations that they say would help Facebook corral hate speech and make civil rights a priority when moderating content.

Zuckerberg and top executives, who have agreed to meet with the civil rights groups behind the Stop Hate for Profit boycott this week, plan to release the company’s third civil rights audit, which Facebook says will address many of the activists’ concerns, as well as other policy changes that were already under consideration.

The pressure on Facebook seems intense, but it may not be as powerful as the headlines make it appear.

Brands

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Make a vaccine? I’m trying to teach my kids the alphabet

By Kate Holton, Emma Thomasson and Stephen Jewkes

LONDON/BERLIN/MILAN (Reuters) – It’s tough to do any useful work when you’re stuck at home, struggling to home-school bickering kids, let alone when you’re trying to produce a COVID-19 vaccine.

British drugmaker AstraZeneca <AZN.L> had spent years preparing for a pandemic, but when the moment finally came it was caught cold on a crucial front: stressed parents working from home struggled to focus.

    So the company recruited up to 80 teachers to run online lessons and repurposed a car parking app to book virtual classes. It also lined up personal tutoring and helped to locate some childcare spaces for those battling to adapt to the abrupt change to their lives.  

    The move by Britain’s biggest drugmaker, and similar efforts by companies the world over to host everything from magic classes to yoga for children, shows the lengths businesses are going to to

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